Bergen County Historical Society
 SCHEDULE of Events & Lectures
Through part of 2020

Calendar PDF - Link

The buildings at Historic New Bridge Landing are only open for events.
The grounds are open dawn to dusk.
SCHOOL OF INTERPRETATION & VOLUNTEER MEETING
January 15, 2020, Wednesday, 7:30 pm
Topic: TBA


For anyone interested in volunteering at Historic New Bridge Landing events as a docent, greeter, operations personnel, or living-history interpreter in period dress, the Bergen County Historical Society sponsors the School of Interpretation to hone communication skills, familiarize volunteers with Bergen’s unique history, give insight into the material culture of the past, and train volunteers in historical presentation. It also provides an opportunity for prospective participants to ask questions and learn about volunteering with BCHS. Please meet at the Steuben House (the house nearest the bridge). No charge.

Brigid’s Day, Candlemas at Historic New Bridge Landing
Are the days too frigid and the nights too long for you at this time of year? Is darkness depressing and the cold’s in your bones? One solution is a trip to the tropics, but if that doesn’t fit your schedule, come celebrate Brigid’s Day and Candlemas at Historic New Bridge Landing along the Hackensack River in River Edge on Sunday, January 26, from 1 to 5 p.m.

Escape the winter blues as people did for over a thousand years in celebrations of warmth, light, and music. Sit in the main room of the 267-year-old Steuben House and tap your feet to Irish music played by The Racket River Girls. With fiddle, guitar, concertina, and harmonious vocals, they’ll transport you back to old Ireland; you’ll swear you smell the peat fire! (Performances are at 1:30 and 3:30).

We are rolling out new exhibits in the Steuben House featuring BCHS’s collections of New Netherland and Jersey-Dutch artifacts including artifacts we received from the George Way estate. Several items, for example a large trivet, are marriage relics featuring hearts. George Way was a collector of 16th and 17th century material culture, Jonathan Friedman benefited BCHS with several objects after Way’s passing.
Make sure to stop by the Out-Kitchen to see how candle-making was done; drop in the tavern for some seasonal refreshments or a peek at the treasures in the gift shop. Wee ones with you? They can make an authentic brideog (a Brigid’s Day doll) from cornhusks or fashion an Irish Brigid’s Cross from reeds. As always, the eighteenth century stone houses will be open with knowledgeable interpreters to help you understand the lives of earlier Bergen residents.

Admission: $12 adults; $7 students 6-22 yrs; BCHS members free! (Take an annual membership and support preserving Jersey’s past: $20/individual, $30/household). Free onsite parking or take a train on the Pascack Valley Line from Secaucus via NJ Transit to the "New Bridge Landing" train stop, walk one block north & east. HNBL is only 5.6 miles from the GWB. HNBL, 1209 Main St, River Edge, NJ. BergenCountyHistory.org

SCHOOL OF INTERPRETATION & VOLUNTEER MEETING
February 19, 2020, Wednesday, 7:30 pm
Topic: History & Architecture of the Campbell Christie House

Park Commission Chairperson and BCHS President Jim Smith and Past President Deborah Powell will discuss.

For anyone interested in volunteering at Historic New Bridge Landing events as a docent, greeter, operations personnel, or living-history interpreter in period dress, the Bergen County Historical Society sponsors the School of Interpretation to hone communication skills, familiarize volunteers with Bergen’s unique history, give insight into the material culture of the past, and train volunteers in historical presentation. It also provides an opportunity for prospective participants to ask questions and learn about volunteering with BCHS. Please meet at the Steuben House (the house nearest the bridge). No charge.

Dance mistress Denise Piccino and the Tricorne Dancers will give two one hour public performances in the Steuben House at 1:30 and 3:00 pm. Ridley & Anne Enslow will provide musical accompaniment on fiddle and hammered dulcimer. Throughout the afternoon, Rodger Yaden will portray General George Washington. Hot cider and crullers will be served in the restored 18th-century tavern in the Campbell-Christie House, where our gift shop is also located. Visitors may also see open-hearth cooking demonstrated in the Out-Kitchen, featuring meal items that General Washington might have eaten during his stay at New Bridge in 1780 and recipes from Martha's cookbook. Re-enactors from the 3rd New Jersey Regiment will demonstrate milita. The George and Martha Centennial Quilt is on exhibit for this event.

So celebrate the 288th anniversary of Washington’s Birthday at Historic New Bridge Landing, where General George Washington made his headquarters in September 1780, when Continental troops encamped between Van Saun Park in River Edge and Soldier Hill Road in Oradell. A tiger-stripe maple bedstead, reputedly used in a local home where George Washington stayed during the 1780 Steenrapie Encampment, is displayed in the Demarest House. The room in the Steuben House where Washington stayed for ten days during the Steenrapie Encampment is also open for viewing.

Historic New Bridge Landing:  
American Revolutionary War Battleground including 3 Jersey-Dutch Sandstone Houses, Exhibits, Tavern, Gift shop & Outkitchen. (Barn closed in cold weather)  $12 adults, $7 students, BCHS members free. HNBL, 1201-1209 Main St., River Edge, NJ. Site map below. (Become a member and support our efforts, $20 individual / $30 household)

Check our website for event updates  | www.bergencountyhistory.org | contactBCHS@bergencountyhistory.org | 201.343.9492

All 3 Jersey-Dutch Houses are connected by a gravel walking path. Free parking is available or take a train on the Pascack Valley Line from Secaucus via NJ Transit to the New Bridge Landing Train stop.

BCHS School of Interpretation & Volunteer Meeting
Wednesday, February 19, 2020, 7:30 p.m.

Topic: History and Architecture of the Campbell-Christie House
One of the busiest places at New Bridge is the Campbell-Christie House, which serves as our tavern today just as it did two hundred years ago in its original location. This pre-Revolutionary War house has served as both a home and a business, as well as the birthplace of an important New Jerseyan. Come and hear BCHS President Jim Smith and BCHS Past President and Museum Collection Chairperson Deborah Powell discuss the history, architecture, and people of this bustling hub of Historic New Bridge Landing.

For anyone interested in volunteering at Historic New Bridge Landing events as a docent, greeter, operations personnel, or living-history interpreter in period dress, the Bergen County Historical Society sponsors the School of Interpretation to hone communication skills, familiarize volunteers with Bergen’s unique history, give insight into the material culture of the past, and train volunteers in historical presentation. It also provides an opportunity for prospective participants to ask questions and learn about volunteering with BCHS. This month, please meet in the Campbell-Christie House (the house nearest the parking lot). No charge.

BCHS Lecture Series, February 27, 2020, 7:30 pm
The Usual Suspects: General Washington, His Critics, and the Conway Cabal Reconsidered by Mark Lender
Over late 1777 and early 1778, dismayed by Washington's repeated defeats, senior patriot military officers—most notably major generals Thomas Mifflin, Thomas Conway, and Horatio Gates—and allied political figures ostensibly launched an effort to limit Washington's control of the Continental Army, if not to actually replace him with Gates. The episode has come down to us as the "Conway Cabal." Since the 1941 publication of Bernhard Knollenberg's Washington and the Revolution, however, most modern scholarship has discounted the existence of any serious "cabal," writing off the matter as unfounded fears of conspiracy among Washington’s inner circle. Professor Lender will argue that the cabal was not only real, but that it posed a genuine threat to Washington's command. Moreover, he believes that Mifflin, Gates and Conway—the "usual suspects"—indeed were at the heart of events. But instead of some clandestine conspiracy, Washington's critics worked through the reorganized Board of War in which Mifflin and Gates held particular influence. Under their lead, the Board initiated measures to take control of vital army training and logistics functions as well as operational decisions. Enacted with congressional approval, these measures, had they succeeded, would have negated Washington's prerogatives as commander-in-chief and left the title meaningless—whether or not Washington elected to remain in the army. The eventual defeat of the cabal was a key step in Washington's consolidation of his position in the army and his rise to iconic status in the Revolution itself.

Mark Edward Lender has a Ph.D. in American History from Rutgers University. He is Professor Emeritus of History at Kean University, from which he retired as Vice President for Academic Affairs in 2011. He is the author or co-author of eleven books and many articles and reviews, and his writings have won awards for history, writing, and research. His Fatal Sunday: George Washington, the Monmouth Campaign, and the Politics of Battle (with Garry Wheeler Stone) won the Society for Military History’s Distinguished Book of the Year Award (2017) and was a finalist for the George Washington Literary Prize. His latest book, Cabal! The Plot Against General Washington (2019), is the first full study of the Conway Cabal that threatened Washington’s command of the Continental Army. He is a recipient of the Richard J. Hughes Award, the highest honor bestowed by the New Jersey Historical Commission for contributions to New Hersey history. Lender lives in Richmond, Virginia, with his wife, Rutgers University librarian emerita and author Penny Booth Page. He retains a great fondness for her, the history of his native New Jersey, and Elvis.

The Lecture Series meets in the Steuben House, 1209 Main Street, River Edge, NJ. No admission, please join us for refreshments afterwards.

BCHS School of Interpretation & Volunteer Meeting
Wednesday, March 18, 2020, 7:30 p.m.

Topic: Countdown to America 250: Political Imagery

On March 5, 1770, British soldiers fired into an innocent Boston crowd, inflaming colonist anger and creating one of the most iconic images of the Revolutionary period. But were they innocent? Join Jim Smith, BCHS President, as we examine that fateful day, get to the bottom of the events the occurred, and find out how images and documents can shape our opinions over time.

For anyone interested in volunteering at Historic New Bridge Landing events as a docent, greeter, operations personnel, or living-history interpreter in period dress, the Bergen County Historical Society sponsors the School of Interpretation to hone communication skills, familiarize volunteers with Bergen’s unique history, give insight into the material culture of the past, and train volunteers in historical presentation. It also provides an opportunity for prospective participants to ask questions and learn about volunteering with BCHS. Please meet in the Steuben House (the house nearest the bridge). No charge.

Jersey was part of New Netherland too! Come celebrate the Jersey-Dutch and Women's History with the Bergen County Historical Society on Sunday March 22, 2020, 1 pm-5 pm at Historic New Bridge Landing, 1201 Main Street, River Edge NJ.
We have two talks in the Steuben House, a state historic site, in addition to the historic site open.


1:30 pm: Jonathan Friedman speaks on George Way, his partner. Way was a prolific collector of Dutch and New Netherland material culture. After he passed away in spring 2019, The George Way Estate distributed the collection to several museums and historical societies including the Bergen County Historical Society. These objects join selections from the Society’s collections in new exhibits in the Steuben House, an 18th c. sandstone mansion on the Hackensack River.

2:15 pm: March to the Vote & Women’s History: Four Generations of Dutch Women in New Netherland by Dr. Meta Janowitz

The slogan “well-behaved women seldom make history” was coined by the historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich for her study of 17th- and early 18th-century New England. By “history” she meant the past as seen through books written by historians, both professional and avocational. Her own work brought the stories of ordinary women to life using original documents and official records to create a history that emphasized the contributions of these well-behaved women to the establishment and success of the colonies. In New Netherland there were also well-behaved women who made history through the actions they took to ensure the success of their families, which in turn affected the success of the colony under both Dutch and English rule. The daughters, granddaughters, and great-granddaughters of Tryn Jonas van Maesterland, described by a scholar of the period as “New Netherland’s Eve,” left their mark on events through their roles as business women, wives, mothers, and widows. Tryn’s daughter Anneke Jans, granddaughter Sara Roelofse, and great-granddaughter Blandina Bayard are among the most notable of her descendants and will be the center of this talk.

Dr. Meta Janowitz is an archaeologist and ceramic historian, specializing in the study of pottery made in the metropolitan area during the 18th and 19th centuries. Semi-retired from the Cultural Resource Management crew at AECOM, a large engineering firm, she teaches at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Editor and author for Tales of Gotham, Historical Archaeology, Ethnohistory and Microhistory of New York City. Historical Archaeology of New York City is a collection of narratives about people who lived in New York City during the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, people whose lives archaeologists have encountered during excavations at sites where these people lived or worked. The stories are ethnohistorical or microhistorical studies created using archaeological and documentary data.

When touring the museum site make sure you visit the Outkitchen where cooks will be cooking at the hearth, take the children's scavenger hunt with prize at admissions and have a favored donut of many visitors and cup of hot cider or coffee. All three Jersey-Dutch houses are open for tours.
Historic New Bridge Landing:
 
American Revolutionary War Battleground including 3 Jersey-Dutch Sandstone Houses, Exhibits, Tavern, Gift shop & Outkitchen. Children’s activity & scavenger hunt. (Barn closed in cold weather) HNBL, 1201-1209 Main St., River Edge, NJ. $12 adults, $7 students, BCHS members free. (Become a member and support our efforts, $20 individual / $30 household.)
Check our website for event updates  | www.BergenCountyHistory.org | contactBCHS@bergencountyhistory.org | 201.343.9492

All 3 Jersey-Dutch Houses are connected by a gravel walking path. Free parking is available or take a train on the Pascack Valley Line from Secaucus via NJ Transit to the New Bridge Landing Train stop. We’re only 5.6 miles from the GWB.
BCHS Lecture Evening
March 26, 2020, Thursday, 7:30 pm
Topic: Spirits in Stone: The secrets of Megalithic America: Decoding the Ancient Cultural Stone Landscapes of the Northeast by Glenn Kreisberg

The lecture takes place in the Steuben House, 1209 Main St, River Edge, NJ. No charge. Please join us for refreshments at the conclusion.
Shad Moon

April 19, 2020, Sunday

Admission: $12 adults; $7 students 6-22 yrs; BCHS members free! (Take an annual membership and support preserving Jersey’s past: $20/individual, $30/household). Free onsite parking or take a train on the Pascack Valley Line from Secaucus via NJ Transit to the "New Bridge Landing" train stop, walk one block north & east. HNBL is only 5.6 miles from the GWB. HNBL, 1209 Main St, River Edge, NJ. BergenCountyHistory.org
Pinkster

May 17, 2020, Sunday

SCHOOL OF INTERPRETATION & VOLUNTEER MEETING
May 20, 2020, Wednesday, 7:30 pm
Topic: Interpretation of Cultural Landscapes: Using Nature At New Bridge

Our forebears at New Bridge lived closer to nature than we do today, and both the native and cultivated plants in the area were an important influence in their lives. What trees and plants did they find here in the 1700s, and what did they introduce? How can we restore the “look” of eighteenth century New Bridge? Park Commission Chairperson and BCHS President Jim Smith will address these issues as well as showing volunteers how they can use the natural world around us to interpret history at our site.

For anyone interested in volunteering at Historic New Bridge Landing events as a docent, greeter, operations personnel, or living-history interpreter in period dress, the Bergen County Historical Society sponsors the School of Interpretation to hone communication skills, familiarize volunteers with Bergen’s unique history, give insight into the material culture of the past, and train volunteers in historical presentation. It also provides an opportunity for prospective participants to ask questions and learn about volunteering with BCHS. Please meet at the Steuben House (the house nearest the bridge).

BCHS Annual Dinner, Awards, Election & Presentation
June 11, 2020, 6 pm to 10 pm
Stony Hill Inn
Hackensack, NJ
Save the date, more info to come