English Neighbourhood Sept. 23rd [1778]
7 o’clock P.M.

Dear Sir
The very severe rain almost frightens me about the provisions from Paulus Hook. If a provision sloop could be sent tomorrow to Fort Lee, besides all the other precautions it would make us more secure. I think it so essential a point, in the present situation of the troops, that we cannot use too many means to put it out of the Power of chance to disappoint us. The mistake about the craft yesterday has distress’d us beyond expressions. No Officer has or is likely to have any change of cloaths or linnen or any thing to eat or drink. I hear none of the horses of the regimental waggons are yet landed. Excuse my troubling you, but I know you are full as anxious as myself about this business.
Yrs. very Sincerely
Cornwallis



[Sir Henry Clinton]






University of Michigan, William L. Clements Library, Sir Henry Clinton Papers, Volume 42, Item 2.
English Neighbourhood Sept. 25th [1778]
11 o’clock A.M.


Dear Sir
I think it probable that I shall see you today, but as I am sending off a dragoon to Paulus Hook, I let this line take its chance. This fine weather has made us forget all grievances. The provision is not yet come but we can make a shift today without it. I have not heard of the Sloop at the creek, or the victualler at Fort Lee. I have sent to enquire about them. I am convinced that Fort Lee will be the best & safest manner of our subsisting. I have sent out people to enquire about Militia, Cattle &c. & will do the best I can to get at one or the other. There are certainly not above 200 men of the Continental Army in this part of the Country. You had better bring up the dragoons from Paulus Hook as an escort, for fear of small party’s crossing the Hackinsac river, tho’ there cannot be much danger as I have order’d posts from the 57th Regt. at Brown’s, Schuyler’s, & the Little Ferry.
I am with great truth
Very Sincerely Yours
Cornwallis



[Sir Henry Clinton]





University of Michigan, William L. Clements Library, Sir Henry Clinton Papers, Volume 42, Item 7.
Copy
New Bridge 28th September 1778


Sir,
Having received Intelligence that a considerable Body of Militia and a Regiment of Light Dragoons were assembled in the Neighbourhood af Taapan in order to interrupt our Foraging, a Plan was formed on the Evening of the 27th for surprizing them. Three Deserters from the Right Column alarmed the Militia, who were posted near New Taapan, by which means they made their Escape, but the Left Column, Commanded by General Grey, was so fortunate as not to be discovered, and the Major General conducted his March with so much Order and so silently, and made so good a Disposition to surround the Village of Old Taapan, where the Regiment of Dragoons lay, that he entirely surprized them, and very few escaped being either Killed or taken. He likewise fell in with a small Party of Militia, a few of whom were killed and some taken Prisoners. The whole loss on our side was one Man killed of the Second Battalion of Light Infantry, which Corps had the Principal Share in this Business and behaved with their usual Spirit and Alacrity.
The 71st Regiment, Commanded by Lieut. Colonel Campbell, and the Queen’s Rangers under Lieut. Colo. Simcoe, who crossed the North River from Lieutenant General Knyphausen'’ Division, and were to have co-operated with the other Columns, were prevented by the Desertion of the three Men beforementioned, from surprizing a Body of Militia, who, by that means took the Alarm and made their Escape.
I have the honor to be &c.
Cornwallis



[Sir Henry Clinton]




Great Britain, Public Record Office, Colonial Office, Class 5, Volume 96, Pages 329-330.
English Neighbourhood Octr. 6th [1778]

Dear Sir
I was just too late for you this morning; The Man whom you saw the other day at my quarters came again today. He says positively that not a man is come over at Kings Ferry, but that one hundred have return’d to the other side. He adds that all their Convoy’s & even their Post go by the upper passage at the back of the Mountains. We want much the return of the sloops to carry off the forage, no time shall be lost on our part; I think we may safely stay a day or two after Kniphausen retires, before we take up the position on the neck, perhaps longer if necessary, so that I think you need not delay recalling him on our account.
Yrs. very Sincerely
Cornwallis



[Sir Henry Clinton]





University of Michigan, William L. Clements Library, Sir Henry Clinton Papers, Volume 42, Item 37.
Duplicate
No. 21
New York October 8th 1778

My Lord
On the return of the Troops from the Expedition to Bedford &c, I proposed taking a forward position with the Army, as well to procure a Supply of Forage which we were much in want of, as to observe the motions of the Rebel Army and to favor an Expedition to Egg Harbour, at which place the Enemy had a number of Privateers and Prizes, and considerable Salt Works.
Accordingly, on the 22nd of last Month, I requested Lord Cornwallis to take a position between Newbridge on the Hackensack River in Jersey, and Hudson’s River, and Lieut. General Knyphausen one between Wepperham on the last of those Rivers, and the Brunx.
In this Situation, with the Assistance of the flat Boats, we could assemble the Army on either side of the North River in Twenty four hours, & by our having the Command of that River as far as the Highlands, Mr. Washington could not assemble that of the Rebels in Ten days: to have done it in Jersey he must have quitted his Mountains and risked a general Action in a Country little favorable to him.
As by the Move beforementioned the Provinces of Jersey and New York were opened, we received a considerable supply of Provisions and a number of Families came in.
General Washington did not seem to shew the least disposition to assemble his Army and the Militia, kept at a distance, however, by a well projected plan of Lord Cornwallis’s, almost an entire Regiment of the Enemy’s Light Dragoons were surprised and carried off.
For the particulars of this, I beg leave to refer Your Lordship to Lord Cornwallis’s Report, a Copy of which I have the honour to enclose.
Having acquainted Your Lordship in my Letter No. 20, that the Convoy is now ready for the Expedition, I have therefore directed the Troops to fall back, in order that such of the Regiments as are destined for that Service may proceed upon it without delay.
I have the honor to be &c.
H Clinton



[Lord George Germain]





Great Britain, Public Record Office, Colonial Office, Class 5, Volume 96, Pages 325-327.
English Neighbourhood Octr: 8th [1778]


Dear Sir
I was a little puzzled in obeying your commands, of giving an account of our march. I doubt whether you will think it particular enough, but I thought it best to avoid too pompous an account. I beg you will not scruple to make any alterations you may think proper. They send no sloops from New York, so that we cannot get off from the neck all the Hay we brought in the other day. However if it is necessary to move, we can put it over in Batteaux’s to the Fort Lee side. If I hear nothing of Sloops before tomorrow morning I shall do that at all events & clear the River of all craft as far down as Secaucus, I then shall be able to move at a moments warning; This camp is certainly pleasanter for the troops than that on the ridge will be, by the present intelligence there seems to be no danger, but as we have no material object for staying it will be right to seek no risk. I can move on Saturday without inconvenience, but should be glad to be favour’d with your opinion upon it. I should have sent you the letter from Skinner, but concluded you had a duplicate, you may depend upon my losing no time in transmitting all intelligence to you. I am sorry to hear that there are not above eighty Tons of fresh Hay at Secaucus. I am with great respect
Most Sincerely yours
Cornwallis


Should the present embarkations occasion any
increase to the establishment of Hospital Surgeons
or Apothecary’s I must beg leave to mention to you
Mr. Hill of the 33rd Regt. I can safely answer for
his merit & ability’s. I believe you knew his
Brother with Count La Sifle last war.



[Sir Henry Clinton]






University of Michigan, William L. Clements Library, Sir Henry Clinton Papers, Volume 43, Item 5.
English Neighbourhood Octr: 8th [1778]

Dear Sir
The Sloops are come up & I shall get all the Hay off the neck tomorrow, all accounts agree that there is no enemy in force on this side the North River. I shall now be at liberty to move at a moments warning; I do not see much chance of an effectual blow at any of their posts, if it is done at all it must be before I fall back. The man whom you saw was here again today. He says 150 Light Horse are come over but positively no Infantry. I shall not decide on falling back ‘till I hear from you tomorrow. You are very good to me about the succession of the 33rd, I will write to Lord Rawdon about it.
Yours very Sincerely
Cornwallis



[Sir Henry Clinton]






University of Michigan, William L. Clements Library, Sir Henry Clinton Papers, Volume 43, Item 6.
Sir,
It is with the utmost astonishment and concern I have learnt that certain Gentlemen of the Navy have been pleased to impute my conduct, a loss of time in gaining the Enemy’s rear at Tappan on the 27th of Septr.
As this insinuation is of a deliberate nature, and the first instance of the kind I have met with during the course of twenty years Service, duty to my character, and justice to the troops which I have had the honour to lead on that day, lays me under the necessity of entreating your Excellency’s attention to the inclosed Report, from which simple and impartial state of facts, your Excellency will be able to judge, to whom the loss of a single moment was due.
I shall only beg leave to add, that in corroberation of this statement, your Excellency can only have the testimony of a thousand men and Officers.
I have the honour to be with great respect
your Excellency’s
Most Faithful and most
Obedient humble servt.
Archd. Campbell
Lieut. Colo. 71st Regt.


King’s Bridge
10th October 1778


P.S. I forgot to mention, that
Most of the Midshipmen were sleeping
During our passage to the Spote.



His Excellcy.
Sir Heny. Clinton K.B. &c &c &c




University of Michigan, William L. Clements Library, Sir Henry Clinton Papers, Volume 43, Item 12.
English Neighbourhood Octr: 10th [1778]


Dear Sir
As the weather looks still very unsettled I shall stay a day or two longer before I fall back, unless I should receive any intelligence that may make me think it advisable to do it directly; In the mean time should any opportunity offer of striking a blow, you may depend on my not losing it. I am however of opinion that it will not happen. Two men came this morning from Tappan & said that nothing had pass’d the North River.
I am most Sincerely Yours,
Cornwallis



[Sir Henry Clinton]




University of Michigan, William L. Clements Library, Sir Henry Clinton Papers, Volume 43, Item 14.
English Neighbourhood Octr: 12th [1778]

Dear Sir
I have just received yours of the 10th & shall fall back to the Ridge position tomorrow morning; as the foraging of Secaucus will be finish’d tomorrow evening, I propose on the next day to retire to some position near Bergen, unless you wish me to remain longer near Fort Lee. I am with great regard
Most Faithfully Yours
Cornwallis



[Sir Henry Clinton]




University of Michigan, William L. Clements Library, Sir Henry Clinton Papers, Volume 43, Item 20.
English Neighbourhood Monday Night
Octr: 12th [1778]

Dear Sir
I have just received yours of this date. I shall tomorrow take the position near Fort Lee & march on Wednesday the 14th to the Neighbourhood of Bergen. I think Paulus Hook will be the most convenient for the embarkation part of which may if you please commence on Wednesday afternoon. I shall not fail to inform Capt: Parker of my quitting Fort Lee. I will do myself the honour of waiting on you on Wednesday Morning at New York. Nothing new Here.
Yours very Sincerely
Cornwallis



[Sir Henry Clinton]




University of Michigan, William L. Clements Library, Sir Henry Clinton Papers, Volume 43, Item 21.