Head Quarters 9 Sept. 1778

Sir
Major Clough, who commands at Hackensack, is under the necessity of sometimes allowing persons to carry small matters into New York, and to bring a few goods out, that he may the better obtain intelligence. The persons employed in that way are sometimes stopped by your guards, under suspicion that they are carrying on a contraband trade. You will therefore be pleased to give orders to your officers not to detain or molest any person shewing a pass from Major Clough.
I am &c.
[George Washington]



To the officer commanding
the militia at Hackensack
New Bridge


Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 24 July 1778 — 12 September 1778.

Hackingsack Septr. 22nd 1778

Dear Sir
Capt. Smith whome I have pitched on to go to Boston has been so much indispos’d that he was not able to set out sooner than this morning. I must beg leave to refer you to him for the relation of an affray that has happened here between the civil authority and Major Clough; my motives for troubling you with this dispute is that complaints have been made to the Governor who will probably make them known to you.
We are about to move to Paramus which is the most convenient place, to this post; where the Regiment can be quartered together, which is necessary both for our safety and the keeping of good order; the distance is about eight miles from this. By some persons from New York we are informed that the Enemy have left Rhode Island, if it is so, I make no doubt but what you have it confirmed before this.
I am Sir with the
greatest respect your most
Obedient Humble Servant
George Baylor



[George Washington]


The Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 – 10 October 1778.

Elizth. Town 22nd Septr. 1778
Sir
I have to Inform your Excellency that last Evening above 40 of our Officers that was Prisoners with the Enemy came here besides some Sea men & Officers that is come since that I have not seen. They all agree in this point that they are either going on some Expedition or they are going to leave New York. Some says there is two expeditions on foot one up the sound the other up the North River and through this way but they say this may be with a design to get fresh Provisions and cover their embarkation.
They have got all their Transports passed through the Carpentors Hands only 28 and gone out into the Stream. They have embarked a good many of their heavy Cannon shot and Baggage some thinks they are going off intirely only leaving a Garrison at Hallifax, Some at Cannada, a strong party to the West Indies & the rest to go to England. There is this much certain they are going some where. They say further that Governor Tryon & General Robinson is ordered home for giving wrong Intelligence to the Minstry but I believe it is only a pretence for their packing up to go with the others.
When I get more news I shall send it on and am your Excellencys Most Obedient
Humble Servant
Wm. Maxwell


His Excellency General Washington



The Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 – 10 October 1778.

Hackingsack Septr. 23rd 1778
Dr. Sir
I yesterday received intelligence from a party of militia which was sent down to Bergen, that lait in the afternoon a number of Transports came as near to Powles hook as they could and landed a considerable boddy of men, other parties have returned and confirm this account. They (the Enemy) encamped last night in Bergen wood about five miles on this side of the river on the road to the liberty pole. From the shair of ground which they took up on their march, & on their encampment, I suppose their number to be about five thousand.
A Regiment of Militia which were here last evening to assist the sherrif in taking two of my men Prisoners deserted us, as soon as this news was heard, the Colo. himself could not be prevailed on to stay.
The Bearer has a letter for you which was sent out late last evening by the liberty pole; by the same conveyance I received one for the President of congress and others the members.
I am Sir with the
greatest Respect your obt.
Humble Servant
George Baylor


The Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 – 10 October 1778.

Kings Street Sept. 23rd 1778

Sir
Some time in the day Yesterday a Country man was seen on the North river who told that a large Body of the enemy had Crossed the North River into the Jerseys the day before. About the time he says they Crossed my Patrolls inform me they heard a Smart Firing of Small arms on the other Side of the river, as they thought. I immediately on hearing this Sent Colo. Grayham to Dobb’s Ferry with orders to provide a Propper person, and Send over the river to make what Discoverys he Could. He is not Yet returned neither have I heard from him. There are ten deserters from York Island Yesterday who knows nothing of Such a movement. They Say that about the time it is said that they (the Body of troops) Crossed over The river Four Regiments imbarked for the west Indeas, and are now Lying off New York in the North River in Readiness to Sail. By the last Accounts From York the Transports are preparing to receive the Cavelry and they are accordingly ordered to hold themselves In readiness to embark on the Shortest notice. However I hourly expect a very good man out, who will give me a more particular acct. of things in Genl.
Agreable to Your Excellencys orders I have Sent an officer to post the Horseman on the road from this to Head Quarters for a more Speedy Conveyance of Intelligence. The gentleman will wait on Your Excellency with this letter and at the Same time Acquaint You where He has Fixed the Horseman. I have not as Yet been obliged to make use of more than Fifteen Guineas. That I have still Ten remaining, but as Colo. Grayham & Capt. Leavenworth My two prinsable hands are now out it is more than probable that I shall be called on for the greater part if not the whole remains of the 25. I shall be as Sparing of the hard money as possable. When I am out I shall agreeable to Your Excellencys directions send for more. The deserters I mentioned in my Last are part 15 taken, by the partie I sent in Persute of them, and Brought to Camp last night. The others I hourly expect as they was not farr a head of those taken, But on a nother road. Previous to Your Excellencys desire I Had a partie constantly in View of the North river and Shall take particular Care in Case of a movement of The enemy by that way to give the earliest information Possable as You direct. I am Just inform’d that the troops That landed at white Stone marched the next day for New York.
This day proving so exceeding bad I had Concluded to wait untill the weather was better before I posted the Horsemen, but a deserter, the Serjant Majr. of the 2nd Betallion of Hylanders coming out with the following intelligence I thought proppor to forward it immediately. He says that the 1st & 2nd Battallions of hylanders with Some other British regiments, Some of the Greens & about one hundred horse In the whole about 3000 Marched this morning with three days Provision Cooked, he left them four mile this side of kings bridg. They brought with them Several Field peaces and a Number of wagons. The day has been so very bad that I dont think they have been able to proceed or I should have heard something of By my Hors patrols before this. He says that the 1st & 2nd Brigade of British troops had orders two or three days ago To hold themselves in readiness to imbark for the West Indies on the Shortest notice, and that the Transports are Laying off New York in Readiness to receive them. It is common report among the officers and he has frequently heard them say that New York Was to be evacuated, a Strong Garrison to be left at Rhod Island and the Remainder of the troops wear to go to Hallifax. He says that he heard Some of the Soldiers who was from the City say that 7000 men had gon into the Jerseys about two days ago, which agrees with the accounts I have had. He also Says that a Considerable number of Flat bottom boats was Brought up the North River Yesterday, opposite Kings bridg. If the enemy should not be advancing on us the Hors men Shall Be posted on the road to Head Quarters tomorrow agreeable to Your Excellencys directions. I received Your Favour of Yesterdays date late this evening, to which particular attention shall be paid.
I am Your Excellencys
Obt. Servant
Chs. Scott
12 oClock at night Sept. 23rd 1778



His Excy.
Genl. Washington


The Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 – 10 October 1778.

Paramus Wednesday morng. Sept. 24th 1778
Dr. Sir
I am rendered very unhappy by discovering this morning a very great mistake what I made yesterday, in sending the letter which was directed to the President of Congress to you. It did not proceed from inattention but from a Exception by the twilite of the morning.
I received your favor of the 22nd last night and am sorry that it will not be in my power at present to communicate much intelligence, from the City of New York, our communication being cut off by the party of the Enemy which are out. A party shall be stationed on the North River and every movement of the Shiping up the River, the commanding officer at West point shall be informed of.
The Enemy left Bergen wood early yesterday morning and marched through the inglish neighbourhood, they pas’d by the new bridge two miles without taking the smallest notice of us. I thought it advisable from these circumstances to order Major Fell with his party which consists of one hundred and twenty to the old bridge, he moved there and from thence joined me in this place. The Enemy encamp’d last night on the east side of the Hackingsack River above and below the new bridge. I every moment expect the return of Major Clough whom I sent out last night for intelligence of their numbers and movement.
I have waited some time for Major Cloughs return. I shall close my letter and not wait any longer as I have just received information from a small party of militia that have been down as low as the english neighbourhood. They say that the Enemy have taken all the cattle from the inhabitance where they have been. They make no distinction between Whig and tory.
I am Sr. with the greatest
Respect your obt. and very Humble
Servant
George Baylor

To
His Excellency
General Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Paramus Sept. 26th 1778
Dr. Sir
Since my last to you I have been out to make what discoveries I could of the Enemy’s position & numbers. They are encamped from the new bridge on the Hackingsack river, to the foot of the hill opposite to Fort Lee, in bush huts. They are fortifying a very commanding Hill a little on this side of the new Bridge, which appears to be extensive. They have also thrown up small intrenchments across the two roads leading from Taupan to the Liberty Pole, in the english neighbourhood; one of them is near Scraanburgs meeting house two miles and a half from the new Bridge, the other is a little above the liberty Pole.
Enclos’d is a deserters account who left the Bridge this morning; he also says that it is talk of amongst the Soldiers, that they [are] going up to relieve a Fort of theirs, which is besieged in the back country.
Two General officers are out on this command, Lord Cornwallis & Genl. Gray.
From all the inteligence that I can get they are collecting no more provisions or Forage than is necessary for for [sic] their own use.
Various are the conjectures here of their designs; it was at first suppos’d, to conceal the embarkation of their troop at New York.
I am Sir with the greatest
Respect your most obt.
and very Humble Servant
George Baylor

To
His Excellency
General Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Glantras Hysoner a deserter from the fifteenth regt. says that Lord Cornwallis command consists of two Brigades and the corps of Lt. Infantry and Granadeers and a Corps of refugees with the fifteenth regt., in all about six thousand. Provisions for four days is expected to day from new york. They were throwing up a work on the height above the new bridge and the fifty seventh regt. is stationed in Bergan. The Regiment was stationed at Powles Hook before the enemy came out.



[enclosed in Baylor to Washington, 26 September 1778.]

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Head Quarters Fredericks=
burgh Sepr. 27th 1778
Dr. Sir
I have directed General Putnam to detach a brigade on the west side of the river, to take post somewhere near Clarkstown. You will join his Brigade with the Cavalry under your command and act with it till further orders.
I am Dr. Sir
Your most Obedt.
servant
[George Washington]


To
Colo. George Baylor


Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

The Examination of Michael Mullen, a Deserter from Lord Roden’s Corps. Says he left his Corps yesterday morning, between Hackinsack and the Liberty Pole. That he imagines there is about 6,000 Troops on that side the River; That Lord Cornwallis Commands. That they are repairing the Old Bridge, at Hackinsack, to get their Cannon over. That there is no Troops on the west side of the River, but British & Hessians. That the New Levies Garrison the Forts at the Bridge. That the Troops take from the inhabitants all their Cattle, Hogs, Fowles & Forage of every kind.



[28 September 1778.]




The Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 – 10 October 1778.

Highlands 29th Septr. 1778

Francis McCarny 37th British Regt. Deserted the Evening of the 27th Inst. Says the Regt. lay at the Liberty Pole when he left it. That they were ordered to march Just before he came away. That he came off and informed Col. Cooper of the Militia, that the Enemy were about marching to surprise him and Col. Baylors Regt. That Col. Cooper retired with his Militia without giving any information to Col. Baylor, the consequence of which was that the Enemy surprised and took near all the Regt. That there is the 15th 17th 27th 33rd 37th 44th 46th and 64th British, Lord Rodens Corps, 2 Battns. of Grenadiers, two of Lt. Infantry and two Regts. of Horse at the Encampment on the other side the River. That there is a number of Troops laying in their Rear, of what Corps he cannot tell. That Lord Cornwallis Commands. That he was informed Sir Henry Clinton was to Join them with a large Reinforcement. That he lay at Kings Bridge with a Body for that purpose, when the other Troops cross’d the River. That it was a General Talk among them, that they was coming up to attack the Forts on ye River.
George Motisher 37th British, deserted at the same time and from the same place as the above. Says That there is the 15th 17th 27th 33rd 37th 42nd 44th 46th and 64th British, Lord Rodens Corps, 2 Battns. of Grenadiers, 2 of Lt. Infantry and 2 Regts. of Dragoons. That it was the universal talk among them, that they were coming to attack the Forts on No. River.

The Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 – 10 October 1778.

A Report of Men and Horses in the Third Regt. of L.D. Sept. 29th 1778

Comsn. Officers — 0 Captains, 0 Lieutenants, 0 Cornets.
Non Comisn. — 1 Serjts, 0 Trumpeters, 0 Farriers.
Rank and File — 31 Prest. fit [for] D[uty;] 25 Sick Prest; 56 Total.
Horses — 16 P. fit for D; 55 Sick Prest; 10 Officers; 24 Waggon; 105 Total.

Extrs. 2 Lieuts. } Sick Prest.
1 Serjt. } Do.
1 Ridding Master P. fit for D.


[signed] Edward Conner Ridg. Masr.



[enclosed in Woodford to Washington, 29 September 1778.]



Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Highlands 1st Octr. 1778
Dear Sir
Mr. Putnam has this moment returned, he saw Lord Stirling at Judge Coe’s, who informs him that he had wrote your Excellency the particulars of the Enemy’s and his own situation. Mr. Putnam also saw Col. Hay who lays with his Regt. of Militia at Clarks Town.
Col. Hay informs him that the Enemy have drew in their Picquet from towards Tappan, to a small distance from their main Body, and that by every appearance he thinks they do not intend to advance further in the Country.
The Inclos’d Letter from Lord Stirling I took the Liberty to open, as I had a desire to see what was the situation of Col. Baylor. Inclos’d is also a Letter from Genl. Woodford.
I have the Honor to be with great respect
Dr. Sir
Your most Obedt. Servt.
Israel Putnam

P:S:
There is no shipping in
the River higher than F. Washington.
I am informed a party from Genl. Scott’s
Brigade have Ambuscaded a party of the
Enemy and taken & killed 25 & taken
15 Horses.



[George Washington]


Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Kakiyate Octobr. 1: 1778
Dear Sir
I wrote you Yesterday afternoon by a Messenger from General Maxwell. I found Genl. Woodford with his Brigade at the Court house about two miles East of this place. They are now on their march towards Paramus. The best account of the Situation the Enemy & of Col. Baylor & the wounded of his Corps is Contained in the enclosed Letter from Dr. Griffith to Genl. Woodford. I think at least two Regiments of Maxwells should move up towards Equakanoch for unless the militia have some Support, they will not Stay. However I will see what the motions of the Enemy are this day & determine accordingly. This moment a deserter from Lord Rawdons Corps is Come in, and tells me the Enemy are about to make a move some where he thinks to Morris Town, for he heard of Stores being there. If they should attempt it we shall make but a poor figure in opposing them as the Cheif part of British troops are over however we will do the best we can. I am your Excys. most Humble Servt.
Stirling



[George Washington]





Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

[Extract of a letter from George Washington to Major General John Sullivan, dated Fishkills 1st October 1778.]

“I recd. yours of the 29th at this place, to which I have removed for the convenience of gaining intelligence of the motion of the Enemy who are out in considerable force on this side of Kingsbridge, and in Bergen County in Jersey. They seem to be foraging, in which they are busily employed. A few nights ago the party in Jersey made an unlucky stroke at Colo. Baylors Regt. of Horse laying at Harrington about four miles from Tapan. They were compleately surprised in their quarters and upwards of fity men killed and taken. The Colonel and Major Clough were both wounded and taken prisoners. The latter is since dead and the former in danger. All accounts from New York yet mention the intended evacuation of that place, but I cannot say they are sufficiently satisfactory to enable me to determine.
“Colo. Butler with a part of the light Corps retaliated upon the enemy in some measure yesterday morning. He surprised about 150 Chasseurs and Yagers, took a Lieut. and eighteen privates, and left ten dead upon the spot, not a man upon our part was either killed or wounded.”







Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

No. 739. To Captn. John Stith 3rd Lt. Drs. (Instructions)

Sir
You are, as speedily as possible, to collect all the men, Horses and accoutrements remaining of Colo. Baylors Regiment and proceed to Springfield in Jersey, where you will consult with Mr. Caldwell the D. Qr. Mr. upon the most proper place for the accommodation of the men and Horses, so as not to exhaust the forage that lays convenient for the Travelling Teams, and other purposes. The design of your being ordered on this business is to recruit the Horse as expeditiously as possible, and it is hoped you will exert yourself to effect so essential an end. The sick you will take care to have placed in the Hospital most convenient to you, and where it may be in your power to visit them. That part of the Regiment now with Genl. Woodford, requiring your attention too, will, as soon as they can be spared from the service they are on, be ordered to join you, of this you will give the Serjeant who commands them notice. As soon as can be, you will transmit me a very particular return of the State of the Regiment Specifying where the Officers and men are.
Given at Head Qurs. Octor. 1st 1778.

G Washington




Library Of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 3b, Varick Transcripts, Letterbook 6, Pages 272-273.
No. 740. To M. General Lord Stirling New Jersey.

Fishkill 2nd Octor: 1778

My Lord
I have been favoured with yours of the 30th Septr. and 1st instant from Kakiate. You will make such a disposition of the troops, as shall seem to you most eligible, for your own security, and for checking the excursions of the Enemy.
The enclosed for General Maxwell directs him to obey your orders. You will therefore draw up such part of his Brigade as you shall think proper. He and all the people about Elizabeth Town are very anxious for the whole to remain there. But that which is most conducive of the General good, must be done. In my opinion, all the demonstrations that have been made of landing from Staten Island have been for the purpose of drawing our attention and force to that point.
I came hear [sic] the day before yesterday for the greater convenience of receiving intelligence from both sides of the River. Whatever information you get of the intentions of the Enemy be pleased to forward immediately. I am with great Regard
Yours &ca.

G. Washington

Library Of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 3b, Varick Transcripts, Letterbook 6, Page 273.

Highlands 3rd Octr. 1778
Dear Sir
I sent Mr. Putnam down the River yesterday by Water, to learn for certain whether any of the Enemys Shipping was up. He return’d last night, and informs me that he went down on the West-side nearly oposite Philips’s; that there is one Galley laying near Philips’s, which is the only water Craft of any kind, above Fort Washington. The Boats with which the Enemy landed at the Slote have all return’d to this shore. There is not any considerable number of Shipping at Fort Washington, nor (as I can learn) any disposition made for sending a force up the River.
The Enemys main body still continue at Scrawlinburgh, the Liberty Pole, and the New-Bridge; the principal force at the former.
I am with great respect
Dear Sir
Your most Obedt. Servt.
Israel Putnam

P:S:
Col: Hall informs me
that there is two serjeants
of the Deliware Regt. Confin’d
in the Provost. There is now a
Genl. Court Martial sitting here,
and as all the Witnesses are with
the Prisoners, I should wish, if it
was consistant, they might be sent here
for tryal.



His Excellency Genl. Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

October 9th 1778
Dr. Sir
I send you the best intelligence, that I am capable of getting at present. There seems something odd to me in the movements in York. There is a great quantity of iron pots, pans & stoves shipping on board some large ships & the Qr. Master of the Waldecks stationed on this Island informs me that their Regt. has recd. orders to embark in two or three days for Quebec. Colo: Stirling of the 42nd informs me that all the invalids are to be embarked & sent to garrison the Island of Providence and all the officers of the 5th & 55th still expect orders every hour to embark for the west Indies. I was inform’d yesterday by a gentleman in York that a certain Captn. of a Seventy four was heard to say in a Coffee house that an express from Rhode Island had brought disagreeable news & that the Brest fleet was arrived at Halifax & that Admiral Keppel was killed & two of his fleet destroy’d. How far this may be depended on is uncertain but I am apt to think there is something in the report, as there is a downcast look this two days in many of the officers of my acquaintance.
I left the army at Newbridge yesterday & am quite asham’d to inform you of the treatment the unhappy people meet with. The whole country stript naked, I saw a poor tory who has been six months in confinement at morristown & the fellow was begging of the soldiers for his children. Thus fare the tories in this quarter. I am surpriz’d to hear nothing of the green coats & some companies drafted from the 5th & 55th who went to Egg harbour, as there is much expected from them here.
From your dutiful son
John Vanderhoven

Afternoon 4 oClock

I am this instant inform’d that some ships have fallen down to the narrows to take on board troops & it is said the 40th Regt.
I have stored a quantity of wines where you can get them in a short time & should be very happy to see you if possible.
If such a thing could be as for me to come privately & see you I should be very happy & beg you will let me know by the bearer.
J.V.



Mr. Cornelius Van derhoven
New Jersey

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.