No. 712 To B General Maxwell Eliza. Town

Head Qrs. Fredericksburgh 27th Septr. 1778.

Sir
I received yours of the 19th and 22nd Instant. As the party of the Enemy now on a forage in the Jersey, are in considerable force, and from the latest intelligence, have taken post at the liberty pole, extending themselves to the new bridge on the Hackensack River. You will therefore immediately march to the high grounds, west of Acquakenonck with your Brigade, in order the better to cover the Country, the public Stores at Morristown, give confidence to the militia, and promote the driving off the cattle &ca. It may be expedient to have a small party at Elizabeth town to watch the Enemy on Staten Island and forward your information from New York.
I have ordered a Brigade, under General Woodford to take post at or near Clarkstown, you will mutually communicate with and assist each other.
I need not recommend a careful observance of every precaution necessary to prevent a surprise, by a sudden and rapid movement of the Enemy, and am
Sir Yours &ca.
G Washington


Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 3b, Varick Transcripts, Letterbook 6, Pages 248-249.

Elizth. Town 27th Sept. 1778

Sir
I take this oportunity by Mr. Woodroof to inform your Excellency of our affairs for some days past. I have desired that Colo. Baylor would give you constantly an account of the Hackinsack affairs. The day before yesterday we had a Flag Boat at New York with a little Flour. They saw one 20 Gun ship, between 12 & 18 small armed Vessels and about 50 Flat bottom’d Boats go up the North River. They also saw 10 or 12 of the small armed Vessels come to Statton such as went up the N. River, with a good number of men in them. General Vaughan at the same time took the Command of the Island; While the Capt. of the Flag was in New York & Statton Island it was every ones opinion that they would attack us, the night before last or yesterday morning and was making a Shew of repairing the Bridge opposite to the old Point we had further Information in the morning that they would attack us certainly at 11 oclock; and at half past 10 they hove in sight 11 sloops Schooners Gundalows &ca. besides a number of flat Bottomed Boats, the day was pasing and we did not know but there was many more in their rear, they came on straight for the Point till two of them got on ground, the rest bore up Newark Bay and the others followed as soon as the tide served. Our Men with the greatest cheerfulness was on the road to the point to dispute the Landing with them. They are now at Brown’s Ferry or near it in Hackensack River not far from New Ark. I suppose they are going up with some Provisions to their Troops & to bring of[f] some Forrage &ca. General Heard is at the Short Hills last night with 4 Regts. They have threatned us every night for some time past only last night. I am told that the Enemy does not advance beyond Hackensack River & I am told there is no attacking them below it. General Winds, Coln. Dye and some others is there. If the Enemy was in such a position that I could attack them with any prospect of success I should be glad & leave General Heard here but it is the opinion of most that there can be nothing more done, than keep them within the Bounds of Hackensack River, and that it is likely the Enemy would make a stroke here & Sweep from this to Amboy at least if we should go.
Major Howell Informs me that the Eagle is sailed out of the Hook and he supposes Lord Howe is on her for England. That 44 men confined their Capt. on Board a Vessel, they landed the men but the Wind blowed of[f] the Vessel & Capt. again. I should be glad to have Your Excellencys advice what I should do. Before the Enemy came out the Seamen came to me from 6 to 10 or 12 a Day. I am Your Excellencys
Most Obedient Humble Servant
Wm. Maxwell



His Excellency General Washington


Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Peaks Kill Munday Night O’clock
[September 28, 1778]

Dr. Genl.
Before I got here I mett Doctr. Griffith who returned from the other side Kings Ferry, by his acct. & from several other Hands, the Enemy were advanced as far as Clarks Town, & part of them within three miles of Colo. Hays House. I inclose you a Letter I took from an Express going to Head Quarters. Colo. Spencer has cross’d & advanced three or four miles, but what purpose so small a boddy of men will answer I cannot see & I am in froite least the Colo. should meet poor Baylors fate. I met the bals. of his Regt. with their baggage going they knew not where. I have order’d them to the continental Village, & what few could be mounted & made fitt for service to Join me in the morning when I shall proceed to the Ferry, & enquire into the state of matters before I cross. I cannot see any purpose it will answer for me to cross, & should think Spencer had better be recalled, however I will be guided by your directions & the intelligence I get in the morning. Some Field officers from Philadelphia say they were inform’d as they pass’d from Paramus to Day that the Enemy had detach’d a party to take possession of the clove in order to prevent the country people retireing that way with their Stocks. I am
Sir
Your Obedt. humble Servt.
Wm. Woodford



[Major General Israel Putnam]

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

No. 718 To B General Winds New Jersey Militia

Head Qurs. Fredericksburgh 28th Septr. 1778.

Sir
I just now received yours of Saturday. I have ordered Genl. Woodfords Brigade to cross the North River, and yesterday directed General Maxwell to move up with his Brigade as far as the strong Grounds to the westward of Aquakanunck Bridge. I hope these troops, with the addition of the militia, will keep the Enemy from extending themselves into the Country.
I am &ca.
G Washington





Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 3b, Varick Transcripts, Letterbook 6, Pages 253-254.

Acquacknock the 28 Sepr. 1778

Sir
I Just now receiv’d Intelligence from an Officer Which I sent on a reconnoitering party this morning, that the Ennemy Still remain in their Fortification which they have thrown up on a hight on the West side of the New Bridge near Hackensack. Genl. Clinton Commands, and lays with the main body of his force on Teen Neck, and the English Neighbourhood, their number about said place is said to be Seven Thousand, their number at and about the New bridge or, on the road to Scralenburg I cannot as yet learn. Lord Cornwallis, Genl. Grey, Lord Linsey, Lord John Murray, Abby Crumby & other Genl. Officers whose names I cannot Learn, are with Genl. Clinton, by the Information and the Number of Genl. Officers, I cannot but Suppose the main body of the Ennemy are on the aforesaid Neck & Neighborhood, Constantly are coming up the Hackensack River a Number of Flat bottomed boats to carry of[f] their Forrage, also Arm’d Vessels near 20 have been seen up Hackensack River. I have been hovering round the Ennemy with abt. 8 or 900 men these two Days. I am
Sir
Your Most Obedt. Servt.
Wm. Winds


To
His Excellency Genl. Washington

two Oclock. Just recd. a letter from Major Fell
Who lays at Paramus, that the Ennemy surprised
Last Night & took Prisoners, a Considerable part of
Col. Bayleys [sic] Light Horse.

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

King’s Ferry 28 Septr. 1778 10 oClock A.M.

Sir
This moment Judge Herring, whose residence is near Tappaan, came here, on his flight nortward, and says, that the principal part of the Light Horse, under Col. Baylor, and the Militia, who were advanced, near Orange Town, have been surrounded, and cutt of[f] or taken. That a Body of the Enemy landed at Dobbs Ferry, last evening and that they are beyond doubt, by this time, at Clarks Town. Col. Spencer is now on his March, about a mile from hence, towards Kekeyate, and seems at a loss, how to advance, and at the same time keep clear of their main Body, which may probably be advanced, as far as Kakeyate meeting House, before he passes that place. The Stores at this place, will all be loaded and sent up the River, this day. And I shall endeavour, by going back along the road to Morris Town, as fast as I can ride, to prevent the Waggons, now on that way from falling into their hands, and turn them through Smiths Clove, so as that the supplys may come on to the Army. If I hear at Kakiate, a more particular account of the movements of the enemy, I shall take the liberty of transmitting it to your Excellency. Mr. Herring is a man of reputed veracity, and has formerly been a Member of Congress. His fair character induces me, to give great Credit, to his report. I am with the greatest respect, Your Excellency’s most Obedient
humble Servant
Chas. Stewart C G Is.


P.S. I was yesterday at Newburgh On
my way to Camp & heard there a report of
the Enemy being as far as the new Bridge.
I thought it prudent to come this far &
have the flour on hand sent off directly
and hope my going back as far as the
Forks of the Roads leading to King’s Ferry
to New Windsor may answer a good purpose.



His Excellency General Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Highlands 28th Septr. 1778
8 Oclock at Night

Dear Sir
By Sergeant Robinson of Col: Bailer’s Regt. of Lt. Dragoons, I am this moment inform’d, that this morning just before day, The Enemy found means to surprise Col. Bailer with his whole Regiment, then laying at Harring-Town. They came upon them when they had only one man out to Reconnoiter, which they took and advanced immediately to where the Regt. lay: They was so completely surprised, that Sargt. Robinson tells me, only himself and two officers effected an escape. It is probable he may exagerate a little, but I believe they have met with a verry severe blow.
I have Just seen an officer who informs me that the Enemy last night landed a large body at Tappan Meadows, and advanced towards Kings Ferry.
General Woodford with his Brigade marched this morning. It being late last night, before I Receiv’d your Excellencys Orders, to send the Detachment, and there being a number of them on Fatigue at the Fort, it was late in the forenoon before they could march, I believe they will not get further than Kings-Ferry to night.
Inclos’d is the Examination of a Deserter who has Just come in.
I am with great respect
Dr. Sir
Yr. most Obedt. Servant
Israel Putnam



His Excellency Genl. Washington


Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Elizth. Town 28th Sept. 1778

Sir/
I was honored with a line from your Excellency dated 16th Inst. which I received on my return from our state Clothier. Agreeably to our information the enemy are now manoeuvering, their real design is yet to us a secret, it seems more than that of foraging – what is doing at Hackinsack we are ignorant of. I hope your Excellency has proper information, this much I can ascertain: that they are there in force, commanded by Clinton & Cornwallis. Genl. Vaughan commands 3000 troops at Statten Island, (we expect) to co-operate with the troops at Hackinsack – we have been waiting to receive the Statten Island troops this five days, if they do not move soon, I shall give over looking for them & esteem it a finesse, to keep us, with the Militia at this place. Yesterday & the day before seventy sail of Sloops & Schooners, went up Newark bay for Hackensack, those Vessells are such as are fit for carrying forage, some provision, but no troops were on board them, they were co[n]voyed by three or four small vessels of force. They have now laying at Statten Island, two floating batteries & six Gallies for the purpose of covering their landing, which they give out they will effect in the day time at this place. Genl. Heard will be here this morning with 1000 Men he expects double that number by tomorrow. Genl. Winds lays in the Vicinity of Hackinsack and had last evening about 1000 Men. I shall have certain intelligence from the Island this evening, which I shall communicate if material.
I am with the
greatest respect
M Ogden



His Excellency
General Washington

By Capt. Dickey

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Elizth. Town 28th Septr. 1778

Sir
There is nothing new since I wrote to your Excellency yesterday, save that near 50 Shallops and such small vessels went up the Bay yesterday towards Hackensack, one Row Galley among them. They seem’d to have no more hands on board than sufficient to work them, it is supposs’d they are gone for Hay and Forrage &ca. I had an Officer at General Winses Camp yesterday and could not find that the Enemy made any excursion on the North or west side of the Hackensack save where they had a Redoubt to cover their Bridge. I have heard that they are making two Redoubts or Forts on the East side of Hackensack. I Purpose to send up Coll. Breasley to day by whome I hope to get some certain inteligence. I understand that General Winds has about one thousand Militia besides the Continental Troops & Horse there, it is supposed he has enough to keep them from proceeding through the Country and had we three times the Number there we could not go over that River and that they have possessed themselves of every thing worthey [of] notice from these Considerations Genl. Heard, myself & the Field Officers have thought it best to cover this part of the Country at present unless the Enemy should make farther advances into the Country the other Road. General Vaughan threatens us he would not let my person pass to New York this two days past. I intend to try him to day again. I find he has Two floating Batterys & Eight Row Galleys they say to cover the landing of their Troops on this side. I am your Excellency Most Obedt. Humble
Servant
Wm. Maxwell



His Excellency General Washington


Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Green Bush 28 Sept. [1778]

Sir,
This morning at 7 o’clock we were alarmed by the enemies landing a large body of men from about 100 flat boats, at the slote about two miles from Orange Town. A party of light horse came up as far as Orange Town & paraded on the Green. This moment we have information that there are three ships, a sloop & a galley at the Tappan meadows.

G. Cooper Coll.



Col. [Udny] Hay

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778, 19th Century Transcription by William B. Sprague.

To Major General Lord Stirling

My Lord,
You will proceed forthwith into the State of New Jersey and take the command of all the troops there. These will consist of two Continental brigades under Brigadier Generals Maxwell and Woodford and such of the militia of the state as shall be collected on the occasion. You will make General Maxwell has been directed to move and take post on the heights west of Aquakanunck bridge. General Woodford was is to proceed towards Clarks town. General Winds by with a body of militia was on his march towards Saddle river to join Col. Dey with another body of militia. You will make such a disposition of your whole force as shall appear to you best calculated to cover the country, check the incursions of the enemy, if and give them annoyance, if any opportunity should offer, which may be, with prudence, embraced. I think it It seems most probable the enemy have nothing more in contemplation than a design against the Posts in the Highlands, you will take such a position as will have an eye to their security, that your Continental troops at least may have an easy communication with and be able to succour them should the enemy make an attempt that way. I have been informed there may be a quantity of stores at Morris Town. I have desired the Commissary if it should be so to have them removed as fast as possible. I wish Yr. Lordships particular attention to this matter.
I am My Lord &c.
[George Washington]


General Pulaskis
legion is on its march
from Trenton. They may [be]
hastened forward to join you.


[28 September 1778]

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Col. Hays House Tuesday 12 Oclock
[29 September 1778]

Dr. Genl.
My Brigade has cross’d the River & advanced as far as this place. The best accts. I have been able to collect inform that the Enemy lay Just below Orange Town. There is a report that a large party is gone to take possession of the pass in the Clove, but this wants confirmation. I shall keep partys out for intelligence & move with expedition & caution to the neighbourhood of Clarkstown, unless my information makes it necessary to take another route, of which I will take the earliest oppertunity to inform your Excellency.
I met here with the inclosed Letters, brought in this morning by a Flagg to an officer of Colo. Hays Militia, your Excellency will observe that Doctr. Evans, who wrote by order of Colo. Baylor, requests that a Surgeon may be sent in to Tappan to Dress the wounded. I have taken the liberty to send Doctr. Griffith with a flagg for that purpose.
Some time after Dark last night I fell in with the Baggage, & remains of Colo. Baylors Regt. on the other side the River. I have order’d what few could be mustered to follow me, & the remainder to continue at the Contl. Village till further orders. Of this I have advised Genl. Putnam. I likewise order’d an exact return of them, which the officer has not yet sent in. The bearer is order’d to call for it.
I heard this morning from Elizth. Town Genl. Maxwell is still there watching the motions of Genl. Vaughan who is said to be upon Statten Island with a considerable Force & a number of Boats & some Gallies.
From the best accts. they have not collected many Cattle, the greatest part are drove back in & about Cakiack. I am Just inform’d that Colo. Spencer is at Paramus, where he went to Join Majr. Fell. I am with great Respect
Your Excellency’s most Obedt.
humble Servt.
Wm. Woodford


Colo. Hay informs that he has about
100 Militia, here at Clarks Town &
expects the appearance of the
Continental Troops will soon double
their number.


[George Washington]


Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 —

10 October 1778.
Sir
Your Excellency’s Favour of the 27th Inst. came to hand since I sent of[f] mine of the morning I shewed it to General Heard and as many of the Colls. as was handy, likewise Mr. Caldwell that was here as he knew how the Stores was sittuated in Morristown; We were all of opinion that had Your Excellency received my last Letters and known the sittuation of General Winds and his strength that he is occasionaly on the East & West side of aquackinac Bridge that he occupies partley the same ground that you have aloted for me; that the Enemey makes no moves over the Hackensack &ca. worth mentioning. I say we think that had Your Excellency been informed with all these circumstances and the likelihood of the Enemy crossing here and pillaging this part of the country, as my last letters has shewn you would not have ordered me up to Acquackinac or in that neighbourhood, I have therefore concluded to stand fast with my Brigade at least till an answer from Your Excellency arives to some of my last Letters or till the Enemy offers to make some advances to the Westward, in that case I shall move Immediately and endeavour to fall on their flank or Rear. I send a Field Officer to General Winds dayly to have the necessary Intelligence forwarded to Your Excellency and to me, and will do so.
I am Your Most Obedient
Humble Servt.
Wm. Maxwell


29th Septr. 1778


His Excellency General Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Head Quarters Aquanock 30th Septr. 1778

Sir/
I Just Now Recd. yr. Favour of the 28th and would Inform yr. Exelency, by Diverc Reports the Enemy Consists (some say) of fifteen thousand and some of twelve, and by two Deserters that came to us Last Night say that their whole force is Nearly there – but in my opinion there is Nine thousand Men with seven Generals. I yesterday went with my Troops of Militia Near to their works and fired on their Picquets and Drove them in, but Could Not Draw the Enemy out. I am here Now with a Detachment of Militia of about six hundred men but Cannot keep them Long as they are Daily going of[f] being Allarmed Men.
I am Sir
Yr. Most obedt. Servt.
Wm. Winds



his Rxelency Genl. Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Orange town 30th Septr. 1778
12 oClock

Dear Sir
I am this moment returned from the Enemys Pickets, where I went to ask permission to remain with the wounded at this place. I found the Picket (a Subaltern & 20) about two miles below this, but understand that they havepickets on all the roads leading to Hackinsack, that have no fixed Station but Patrole constantly. The 1st Battn. Light Infantry is close in the rear of their Pickets.
The Wounded left here are Coll. Baylor, the Surgeon and one Private of his Regt. a Militia man & an Old man 73 Years of Age, a resident; who, besides shooting him through the thigh, they severely beat. Major Clow dies yesterday morning, & this day was buried. Coll. Baylor has a wound in his thigh with a Bayonet another in his groin, & Several cuts in his hand with a Broad Sword: I do not think that any of his wounds are very Dangerous – his Intestines are free from Injury – is in good Spirits, & free from all bad Symptoms. The Patrolls were taken, which occasioned his being surprised. Docr. Crosby was here an hour ago, & tells me that, besides the men that you have seen, that escaped, Sixteen have come into Paramus, most of them wounded, two are since dead.
I understand from Sir James Manning, who commands the Infantry, that they are soon to quit Jersey, & that Sir H. Clinton & Lord Cornwallis are both returned to New York. The officer that commanded the Picket told me, that Sir James Wallace came Express from N. York to the General, & that a Packet was arrived. He did not mention any news; & I think he wou’d not have concealed it if he had any to tell that was favourable to them.
I did not obtain the permission I desitred. Sir James desired I would come to their Pickets to morrow, & he would have it ready with such necessarys as Coll. Baylor was in need of. I am, Dr. Sir,
Your most Obedt. Servt.
David Griffith



[William Woodford]

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Kaykiyate Sepr. 30: 1778
4 oClo. PM

Dr. Sir
We are Just arrived here and as it is uncertain where Genl. Woodford is, as some tell me he is at the Court house about two miles from hence, others that he is advanced to Clarks town, others that he [is] marching further on, I shall therefore [stay] here ‘till the messengers I have sent to find him out return. I do not like any of those positions for him – he [is] too nigh [the] River and I think might be turn[ed] on his Right, I think of taking him more westerly towards paramis. They all agree that the Enemy have retired to their Station at the New Bridge above Hackinsack and from thence across to the liberty pole at the Cross Roads to the English Neighbourhood. There was a more determined Barbarous massacre than they made of Baylers Corps, the Colonel is alive at Tappan and I am in hopes his wound is not mortal, poor Major Clow is dead in Short they would give no quarter even to those who Submitted and begged for mercy. The Enemy have near fifty Vessels in Hackensack River loading with forage.
I took the liberty to open the enclosed letters in order to get information of the Situation of Affairs below. I am
Your Excellency’s
most Humble Servt.
Stirling

Dr. Griffith is
with Col: Baylor



His Excellency
General Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

No. 732 To Br. General Woodford Highlands

Head Qurs. near Fredericksburgh 30th Septr.
1778 9 O’Clock P.M.

Dear Sir
I have been favoured with your letter of yesterday. In consequence of the Enemy’s movements on the west side of the North River, I shall proceed to Fishkill Town to day and hold my Head Quarters there, till their intentions are better understood, or while circumstances may make it necessary. You will therefore send all your Letters and information to that post, and you will also be so obliging as to communicate my removal to Lord Stirling, that he may do the same.
I am in hopes there is no foundation for the report you mention of the Enemy’s being at the Cove. That pass is so exceedingly important that they should never be suffered to possess it, and whatever position you take should be calculated to give it perfect security. I have written to Genl. Putnam to send a detachment to occupy the pass leading from Haverstraw through the mountains, by which the Enemy marched to attack Fort Montgomery last year, so that I trust there will be nothing to apprehend from that. You will advise Lord Stirling of this.
I am much obliged by your sending Doctor Griffith to the assistance of Colonel Baylor, Majr. Clough &ca. I regret their unhappy situation and the misfortune that has befallen their Corps.
I am Dear Sir with great regard & esteem
Yours &ca.
G Washington


Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 3b, Varick Transcripts, Letterbook 6, Pages 265-266.

Fishkill 2nd October 1778

Sir
I am favd. with yours of the 29th Septr. Lord Stirling who is now in Jersey, and has the general command of the troops there, will be a better judge than I am of the necessary and proper dispositions to be made. You will therefore implicitly obey him, and either remain where you are at present with your whole Brigade, or detach such a part of it as His Lordship may direct. He mentions the necessity of two Regs. at least at Aquaquenack Bridge to encourage and support the Militia.
I am Sir
Yr. most obedt. Servt.
[George Washington]

P.S. direct Maj. Howell to be
very vigilant in watching the
motions of the enemy fleet and
expeditious in communicating
his intelligence.



[William Maxwell]

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Paramus Octobr. 3rd 1778
7 oClo. AM

Dear Sir
I wrote your Excellency two letters from Kakiyate. I came here the day before yesterday, my time Since has been Chiefly employed in Viewing the Country and getting intelligence of the Enemy: two deserters from the 15th yesterday say their Regiment and Eleven others are in a few days to Embark for the West Indies, that they were Officers Servants and over heard this, which is the Cause of their desertion. I had their lines reconitred yesterday from Hackensack Bridge to Tapan. They are fully employed in forageing. They have two Redouts on the heights on this side of the New Bridge with about 600 men, otherwise Hackensack R[iver] is their Boundary on the west, which they seldom come over. I shall leave Genl. Woodford here with his Brigade, Spencers Regt., the Goshen Militia & some light horse; & shall this morning proceed to Pasaick, where I expect to Genl. Maxwell with two Regts. of his Brigade & 1000 Militia, besides what Genl. Winds has with him. From thence I shall be better able to inform your Excellency of the proceedings of the Enemy below. I am your Excys.
Most Obt. Servt.
Stirling



[George Washington]

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Saturday morng. 8 oClo.
[3 October 1778]

Two more Deserters from the 15th Regt. They tell the Same Story of the twelve Regts. going to the West Indies and that the Embarkation is to take place on Tuesday Next. General Woodford has received your Excellency’s letter of the 30th. A Dragoon of the 16th Came in also yesterday Evening, several other deserters are come in at Clarks Town. I am
your Excellency’s
most Obt. Humble Servt.
Stirling



[George Washington]

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Paramas 4th October 1778

Dr. Genl.
My Lord Stirling left me yesterday morning for Aquackenack Bridge & Elizth. Town & did not expect to return in a Day or two. The Enemy lay in the same situation they did when my Lord Stirling wrote your Excellency last, they appear to be busey at work upon two Redouts on their side the new Bridge, & their Forrageing partys on the other side are very strong. I keep out small scouting partys for the purpose of gaining intelligence, but our numbers will not afford one large enough to cope with those of the Enemy, who are never out of supporting distance, of a Battalion or two of Light Infantry.
We have two or three Deserters of a Day, who all agree that ten Regiments are to go immediately to the west Indies.
Besides my Brigade, Colo. Spencers Corps & about 150 Militia are here, we shift our Camp every night to guard against a surprise. The last night gave us a thorough Soaking. I am with much respect, Your Excellencys Most Obedt. humble
Servt.
Wm. Woodford



[George Washington]

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

No. 751 To M. General Lord Stirling New Jersey

Head Qurs. 4th Octor. 1778

My Lord
It is now Three days since I have received any intelligence from your Lordship; this makes me the more uneasy, as my movements depend altogether upon the indications you give me of those of the Enemy. It is of so much importance to me to be regularly informed, that I must request you will send expresses daily, acquainting me precisely with the Enemy’s position, and communicating such intelligence as you may collect from Spies, deserters &ca. It is often a satisfaction to know that nothing new has happened, altho’ it may not appear very interesting, to make a report of, it will be always in your Lordships power to compensate the dearth of events by favouring me with your conjectures.
I am with great regard and esteem
Your Lordships Most Obedt. Servt.
G Washington


P.S. I open this letter to acknowledge the receipt of your Lordships favour of yesterday. I have also received two New York papers, transmitted me by Mr. Livingston at your desire. I have nothing to add, but my thanks for the intelligence you communicate. Major Washington with Moylan’s Reg. is on his way to join your Lordship.

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 3b, Varick Transcripts, Letterbook 6, Page 285.

Aquakanock Octobr: 4: 1778
3 oClo. P.M.

Dear Sir
I wrote your Excellency yesterday morng. from Paramis, and Came here in the afternoon. I find here General Winds with about 600 militia, General Heard with about 1000, & General Maxwell with the first & Second Regiments of his Brigade. Colonel Dayton with the other two & Col. Neilson with about [blank] militia are at Elizabeth Town. The militia are all home Sick and are every hour apply[ing] for leave to return to their families. I have used every argument to induce them to Stay at this Critical Juncture, and Got the Officers to exert themselves to persuade them what I believe is really the truth, that the Enemy have nearly Completed their forage on the East side of Hackensack River and if they have any thing further in View it must take place in the Course of two or three days. Intelligence of what the Enemy are particularly at is difficult to Obtain, but I have put every Engine to work to get at it. The Sloops with the forrage are begining to go down Hackensack River, and our whale boats have been Successful enough to burn two of them. I forwarded the letter to Count Poulasky by Express but I have heard nothing of him or the messenger. I have sent another this morning to find him out. From the position of the Enemy it is Vain to attempt any thing more than to watch them well. I have ordered the bearer to Call on General Woodford for what Intelligence he may have to Communicate to your Excellency. The Appearances on Staten Island of an invasion from [thence] was Clearly intended to draw attention that way. The Alarm at Elizabeth Town on that account is pretty well over.
4 oClock this moment General Heard informs me that out of 1000 he marched here yesterday he has not 400 left. It is the Same with Genl. Winds & at New Ark and Elizabeth Town. The Spirit of going home is universal under the pretence of haveing been Called out on a Sudden Alarm for two or three days only. I wrote Governor Livingston this morning that I apprehended this would be the Case. I am now sending off an Express to him to let him know our Situation and to request him to order out two Classes of the militia as soon as possible or I shall be obliged to retire to the Hills. The boats on New Ark Bay, have burnt two more of the Enemy’s forage Vessels, 23 of them went down the River this morning. I am
your Excellency’s
Most Humble Servant
Stirling



[George Washington]

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Paramas 5th Octr. 1778

Dr. Genl.
The last inteligence I recd. gives me great reason to think the Enemy are about to move. The inhabitants of Hackensack inform’d an officer of Horse I sent out yesterday, that 100 waggons pass’d that with Forrage to the Boats, & that 3000 Troops marched for New York, the Officers with them said they were to go immediately to the West Indies.
I have a party down from whom I expect some thing to be depended upon. I shall communicate any thing that is worth notice to Head Quarters. I am Respectfully
Your Excellencys
Most Obedt. humble Servt.
Wm. Woodford



[George Washington]


Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Aquakanock Octobr. 5: 1778
one oClock

Dear Sir
About Eight oClock this morning we were Alarmed with Accounts of the Enemy’s Advancing through Hackensack, soon after that about 300 of them were on the heights behind Arent Schuylers house, both accounts prove true. That Body which Came thro’ Hackensack halted on the heights near the head of the polyfly about one mile SW from Hackensack and about four miles NE from hence, and there remain by the last accounts; the party at Schylers were there an hour ago. These movements may be to Cover their forrage Boats going down the River, as they have been grossly Insulted within these two or three days. I have sent for Colonel Dayton to Come up to the heights near Second River with the 3rd & 4th Regts. & what militia is at Elizabeth Town, which I have reason to believe are very few. I wrote your Excellency yesterday that the militia here are reduced to a very small number, and of my Application to Govr. Livingston for some means of Supplying me with a larger number, yet I have but little hopes of any reinforcement ‘till it will [be] too late to prevent them at least forageing this Side of Hackensack River, and perhaps of pushing further, into the Country. I am
your Excellency’s Most Humble Servt.
Stirling



His Excellency
General Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Aquakanock October 6th 1778

Dear Sir
I have received your Excellency’s letter of the 4th Instant. I am Surprized you should be so long without receiving a letter from me, as I have daily wrote at least once. The Enemy after forageing all day on the west Side of Hackensack River within four miles of this place, retired in the Evening to their former Station at & beyond the New Bridge. They had about Six thousand foot & 200 horse out. The 15th Remained at the New Bridge. They are very quiet this day, some say they intend to go off today, and if they do I shall think myself very lucky indeed; for Genl. Heard Came this morning to inform me, that every man of his were marched off, it is the Same with Col. Neilson at Elizabeth town, and all that remain is about 400 with Genl. Winds. I have wrote Govr: Livingston our Situation repeatedly, but have not yet heard from him; the Gentlemen who will deliver this tell me Poulasky’s Legion is on the way & by this time at Prince Town. I am your Excys.
most Humble Servt.
Stirling



[George Washington]

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

No. 762 To, M. General Lord Stirling New Jersey

Octor. 6th 1778

My Lord
I have had just now the honor of your letters of the 4th and 5th Inst.
As we are often obliged to reason on the designs of the Enemy, from the appearances which come under our own observation, and the information of our spies, we cannot be too attentive to those things which may afford us new light. Every minutia should have a place in our collection, for things of a seemingly trifling nature, when conjoined with others of a more serious cast, may lead to very valuable conclusions. The particular kind of forage which the Enemy are now amassing in Jersey, may have a tendency this way – whether it is long or short, such as is usually stored in their magazines for the winter, or procured as provender in sea voyages. You will endeavour, my Lord, to ascertain these matters of information, as well as to collect such further circumstances and facts as may be useful to inform our judgment as to their designs or destination.
I am my Lord, Your Lordships most Obedt. Servt.
G Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 3b, Varick Transcripts, Letterbook 6, Pages 298-299.

No. 722 To B. General Count Pulaski

Head Qrs. Fredericksburgh 29th Septr. 1778

Sir
You are to proceed immediately upon the receipt of this, with your whole Corps both Horse and Foot and put yourself under the command of Major General Lord Stirling, who will be in the neighbourhood of Paramus. As the Enemy are out in considerable force in Jersey, near Hackensack, you will make particular enquiry of their situation as you advance, lest you should fall in with their parties.
I am &ca:
G Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 3b, Varick Transcripts, Letterbook 6, Pages 257-258.

Aquakanock 7th Octobr: 1778
Eleven oClo. AM

Dear Sir
I have received your Excellency’s letter of the 5th. As to the report “of the Brittish fleet of men of war haveing Sailed in quest of the french fleet,” I believe there [is] nothing in it, for I saw a certain person yesterday who must have known it, had it been so, and would have mentioned it; as he was desirous of telling me every Circumstance that has lately happened. Among the rest he informed me, that an Expedition has taken place against Egg harbour, Some frigates and Small armed Vessels with some troops from Staten Island under the Command of Courtland Skinner are Sailed for that place; Also that the Ship or frigate on board of which Genl. Robertson and others have taken their passage, had a number of Vessels under Convoy but that out Sailing some of them she left them, one of which a large transport is taken, having on board some person of Consequence, which Shagreens them much. The Sailing of these two fleets might have deceived the Sailor’s, and account for the two fleets lately seen on the Coast, however I am much Surprized at Major Howels Silence. ‘Tis possible this Egg Harbour Expedition might have engrossed his attention. A Gentleman I have this moment seen, assures me that all was quiet at Egg harbour on Sunday last. Genl. Maxwell has sent two messengers to Major Howell for Intelligence, I have now desired him to send Col. Forman (who is well acquainted in that Country) to go to Middletown, Neversink &c and get all the Intelligence he can and immediately to return.
I wrote your Excellency Yesterday that the Enemy continued forageing about four miles Easterly from this place all day on the 5th and in the Evening retired to their former Station near the New Bridge, where they have Continued very quiet ever Since. There was some fireing of Cannon about Eight this morning in New York Bay near the Narrows, the meaning of it I cannot guess. I take this Opportunity of Sending this by Col. Craig who is going immediately to head Quarters and am
Your Excellency’s
Most Obedient Humble Servt.
Stirling
PS
Major Washington is arrived
with Moylans Regt. I shall keep
him in this Quarter & will send
all the other little detachments
of Horse to Genl. Woodford.



His Excellency Genl. Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 —
10 October 1778.

Acquackinac 8th Octr. 1778

Sir
I have to inform your Excellency that last evening I recd. a Letter from Major Howell dated the 4th Inst. Says that on the 1st Inst. a Fleet of four Ships & eight Brigs Schooners & Sloops sailed to the Southward, designed as they imagined for Egg harbour; Several Signal Guns was heard on the 3rd in the morning and they were again seen off. Same day two Ships went in & one the day before. I wish he had been a little more explicite where the three Vessels went into but I suppose it was into N. York, and what sort of sized Ships was in the Fleet. I suppose they were all small as Col. Dayton writes me by same conveyance, that I may assure your Excellency that the English Fleet had not left Sandy Hook three days ago. The Major says further that it is reported that a General Albemarl is arived at N. York. Two Deserters from the 2nd Battn. Light Infantry at the new bridge this moment came in, says that the 42 & 15th Regts. on the Forraging party was to set off this morning to go to N. York there to Embarque in a few days for the W. Indies. That previous to that the Granadiers & Light Infantry would Joyn their Corps. They say it is thought that the Forrage party is finished or nearly so. I am Your Excellencys
Most Obedient Humble Servt.
Wm. Maxwell



His Excellency General Washington



Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Aquakanoc Octobr. 8th 1778

Dear Sir
I wrote your Excellency yesterday by Colonel Craig, General Maxwell now send you the Intelligence he has Just received from Major Howell. I hope to have something more explicit from thence tomorrow as two messengers besides an Officer have been sent for every particular that has lately happened with regard to the Sailing of Ships. I am afraid the Major has not kept a good look out as he mentions nothing of the fleet which Sailed under Convoy of the Ship General Robertson &c went in. The two deserters which Came in this morng. say it is now publickly talked of that the ten Regts. are to go to the West Indies. They say that they are already Completed by drafts from other Regts. without allowing prisoners with us to be estimated as part of their Strength, and that their Respective Granadier & light Infantry Companies are to Join their Regts.
Two deserters of the 40th are this moment Come in from Staten Island. They say their Incampment in in Sight of the light House, that all the Ships of the Line lay near the hook yesterday except Ad: Byron’s Ship a 90 Gun lays out side the hook. Ad: Parker Comds. in the Bay & about the Narrows, that the fleet was extremely Sickly some Ships of the line not having 50 men fit for duty, they call the disorder the black Scurvy; the Spirit of desertion is Universal in their Army Since it has been publickly known that the ten Regts. are going to the West Indies, theirs is one of them. That their Officers Baggage is on board the transports, that they have all been measured for linen Vests & drawers which are all made but not delivered out. They Confirm that these Regiments are all Completed by drafts from others, that they expect to Sail in a few days. I am
your Excellency’s
Most Obt. Humble Servt.
Stirling



[George Washington]

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Acquakanoc Octobr. 9: 1778
at noon


Dear Sir
I wrote your Excellency yesterday by one of the fixed Expresses returning to Camp from Philadelphia, soon after which I received yours of the 6th, and in order to answer it more fully I rode down to Second River to Converse with Colonel Dayton and the Gentlemen who have more particularly watched the Enemy’s forage boats in their way thro’ New Ark Bay. As to the Sort of forage, they have taken in Short every Sort they Could find. Hay which they have Cheifly packed in in [sic] Bundles very firm, Indian Corn with Stocks & all, wheat and Rye both threshed & in the Sheaf, they have Gleaned every thing of the kind. Three or four large Ships lay for some days at the hither end of the kills, the forage boats were observed to go along side of them, Unload & return to Hackensack R, others went thro’ the Kills unloaded & returned to their business of getting more forage. Near one hundred Sail of Vessels from 20 tun to 80 tun have been employed in this way, but I believe they are almost Done, few have returned the two last days. One of the Vessels burnt in the Bay by our people, was fitted for the Sea, had 60 puncheons of water on Board, Stalls for 32 horses, and was going to take in her hay. I am induced to believe their troops will leave this State very soon, the 15th & another Regiment moved of[f] yesterday morning. Their Second line Composed of two Brigades, and two Batns. of the 71st are not this morning on the ground they lately occupied. The Granadiers, light Infantry and the 57th Regt. keep their position near the New Bridge. An Intelligent man who frequently Crosses the Bay to New York, says he has lately had reason to Observe a more than usual appearance of Industry in fitting out the Transports, but as they lay in different Squads and many of them at a distance from his tract he Could not Judge the Numbers, he thinks several hundreds.
A Number of proclamations by the Commissioners at New York, dated 3rd I find have sent out thro’ Eliza: Town for Congress & the Legislature of this State and the officers of the Army, had I known of it Sooner they should not have been dispersed without the leave of Congress or your Excellency however I believe they will do no manner of harm, it fully proves & acknowledges they had no power to do any thing finally but to grant pardons; they have granted these and will not stay to see who will be Intitled them, they grant no new Inducement to any man to become of their party, and threatned Vengeance with a ruined power, which never Could take it, when in its fullest Vigour. In the frantic Revenge of dispair I believe they will do all the mischief they Can.
I have Just received two letters from Govr. Livingston, rather than give them by Extract, I shall enclose the originals. In Consequence of the present appearances of the Enemy’s going out of this State, I have desired General Winds to order the two Classes mentioned to be held in readiness to march at a moments Warning, but not to move untill further Order. I am much pleased with the Govrs. good humour in wishing us a Safe delivery. I shall ever think it a very Lucky one, If it ends in the manner I have now some hopes it will.
I am with Sincere Respect & Esteem
your Excellency’s
most Humble Servt.
Stirling

4 oClo. I have received your Excellency’s letter of the 7th. I have already informed you that Count Poulasky is gone down to Egg harbour. I have sent such orders to Princetown as If there be occasion the troops fit for Service there may march to the Same place, otherwise all fit to march will come up to Springfield from whence I shall send them to their Respective Regiments as soon as the duty here will admit.
Major Monro is Just Come in from Hackensack. He thinks there is very little alteration in the Situation of the Enemy.



[George Washington]


Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 — 10 October 1778.

Paramis 10th Octr. 1778

Dear Genl.
I forward your Excellency a Letter from Lord Stirling, who agrees with me in opinion that the Enemy will not continue long in the Jerseys. The Desertion increases. I had eight come in to this post the Day before yesterday. They all agree that some capital move is in agitation. Those of the 15th Regt. say it is for the West Indies, & that their Regt. being one of the number for that Service, is the cause of their Desertion. A letter from Colo. Bayard to Mrs. Prevost demands a young Gentleman under her care, for whom he has procured a commission in his Regt. & urges his comeing immediately, as he says the Regt. is going to imbark for service.
I recd. the enclosed yesterday which Colo. Heth is very pressing with me to lay before your Excellency, I have therefore taken the liberty to do so. I am with much respect
Your Excellencys
Most Obedt. humble Servt.
Wm. Woodford



[George Washington]

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 13 September 1778 —
10 October 1778.

Aquackanoc Octobr: 11: 1778
3 oClo. PM
Dear Sir
I omitted writeing to your Excellency yesterday as I was in hourly expectation of receiving Intelligence from Sandy Hook. Capt. Burrows whom I sent for that purpose is Just returned and brought the two enclosed letters from Major Howell, and on further examining he says that yesterday morning at nine oClock there were Six Capital Ships at Anchor on the outside of the Hook, two more Ships of war & 14 transports within the hook. The Report among the troops on the hook that they are going to the West Indies and to Sail very soon, the rest of the men of war & transports Still within and about the Narrows, that no Capital Ships have Sailed lately. That he has it from a person he can depend on, that Governor Livingston has received an Express informing him that General Skinner with 500 men and some Ships of force Entered Egg harbour this day week, and burnt every Vessel or house for fifteen miles up the River. That a very Valuable Cargo of a large prize lately brot. in was destroyed. The Vessels which draw less water went higher up the River and Poulaski’s Horse arriving put a Stop to their progress and the Enemy thought proper to reimbark & go down the River. I am the more Surprized at their takeing them so much.
I have great reason to believe the Enemy are on the point of leaving Bergen County, the deserters that have Come in this day & yesterday all agree that two Regiments embarked on the 9th Instant, the other Eight for the West Indies were to have embarked this day, but I suppose the Storm will prevent them. The deserters within these three days are about 18, Chiefly from the light Infantry & Grenadier Companies of the Regiments ordered to embark. The Officers of those Regts. Baggage all on board, what little Baggage the Officers of the Army in Bergen County had with them was sent of[f] yesterday. 100 flat Bottomed Boats at the landing near fort Lee. All the forageing Vessels gone down Hackensack River, only three or four Armed Vessels remain in it. Most of these Circumstances are Confirmed by others who have been among them. Some say ten, others fifteen Regiments are going to the West Indies, others speak of some Regiments going to Halifax & much at Surprize, as notice of this Expedition was at least a fortnight ago sent to Governor Livingston by General Maxwell, and as soon as I knew of it I put it in the Govrs. power to make use of what troops were at prince Town & trentown. On this Occasion two Classes of the Militia of Monmouth County are now Out; they were to Assemble yesterday. They will serve at least I hope to quiet Major Howels fears and give him an opportunity of affording us some what better Intelligence. The Burning and destroying humour of the Enemy makes me apprehend they will endeavour to give Eliza: Town a Stroke. The moment I see I can with Safety do it, I will move some troops into that Quarter.
I am your Excellency’s
most Humble Servant
Stirling

His Excy. Genl. Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 26 September 1778 — 6 November 1778.

Second river October 12th 1778

My Lord,
I was last night assured by a person from New York who is conceived to be a great friend to the British, that it might be relied upon, “an expedition with the fleet was now” in view. That a great number of persons had been impress’d and put on board and that Negroes (who were said to be hands) were embark’d. My informant really believes their design to be against South Carolina or the French fleet at Boston.
Part of the army, posted near Hackinsack had return’d to New York and the remainder was hourly expected.
I this minute receiv’d your lordship’s letter of this day. The order for a command to Elizabeth town, shall be duly executed. I could wish the march of the Regts. would take place, as this circumstance of the enemy’s movement from New bridge makes the prospect of a visit thither more clear.
I have the honour to be your
Lordships most Humble
Servant
Elias Dayton



Ld. Stirling
Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 26 September 1778 —

6 November 1778.
No. 786 To M. General Lord Stirling New Jersey

Head Qurs. Fredericksburgh 12th Octo. 1778

My Lord
I have received your Lordships favour of the 6th 7th 8th and 9th instant, and thank you for the intelligence communicated in them. I had no material directions to give, or I should have answered them immediately upon their receipt.
As your Lordship’s force is so very unequal to that of the Enemy, I would not wish you to remain so near them, as to intice them to aim a blow at you. Keeping their foragers from extending themselves far from their main Body is your object and all that can be expected in your circumstances.
By the last accounts from General Scott, he was of opinion that the Enemy were withdrawing themselves within the Bridge, but he was not certain. A fleet of transports went thro the sound Eastward, a few days ago, but the weather was too thick to observe whether they had troops on Board. Accounts from every quarter agree that some very capital move is in agitation. I wish your Lordship success and safety, as I am
with great Regard
Your most Obedt. Servt.
G Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 3b, Varick Transcripts, Letterbook 6, Page 320.

Paramis 13th Octr. 1778

Dear Genl.
The Enemys Rear left the New Bridge this morning after seting Fire to their Redouts & Hutts. They took with them several of the Inhabitants, some by force, 7 others voluntarily went with them. I have had partys of Horse round them all Day, they are Just return’d & report that they are incamp’d in the English Neighbourhood, their Rear about three & a half miles from the New Brid[g]e. Lt. Fountleroy took two of their stragling Refugees, & Genl. Grays waggoner, who was returning to his quarters for a large cheese of the Generals that had been left behind. I have only seen two Deserters to Day. I had ten in yesterday, & expect a number have gone in to Clarks Town & it’s neighbourhood. They generly agree in the same story, Vizt. of 10 Regiments going to the West Indias immediately – one only contradicts that acct. & says they are going to attack the Forts up North River. They likewise give out that they are to cut a quantity of wood near Burgen before they leave the Jerseys. A number of flat Bottom Boats at Fort Lee were carrying over Troops last night, & I have good reason to believe that they have been imploy’d in the same service to day. I shall imploy the Dragoons in the morning to gain Inteligence of their situation & designs, & if anything worth communicating to your Excellency is discovered, it shall be forwarded without Delay. I am sorry I omitted keeping an acct. of the Deserters since I came over, but to speak within Bounds, I have given passes to upwards of Fifty at this post.
I took the liberty of conveying the intelligence of the move of the Enemy without waiting for Lord Stirling’s commands, as I thought your Excellency would wish to have the earliest notice of it.
I enclose your Excellency the New York papers of the 12th. I am respectfully
Your Excellencys
Most Obedt. humble Servt.
Wm. Woodford




[George Washington]

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 26 September 1778 — 6 November 1778.

Hackensack Octobr. 14: 1778
one oClo. PM

Dear Sir
I received your Excellency’s letter of the 12th yesterday Evening, I deferred writing ‘till the motions of the Enemy was reduced to a Certainty. I have two parties of horse following their Rear, who send me word they had been at fort Lee where the Enemy had been Embarking all Night. The light Infantry, Granadiers, & horse are gone to Powles hook, their Rear was near Bergen about two hours ago. I enclose a letter from Col: Dayton, and another I have Just received from Govr: Livingston. By every Circumstance I can Collect a grand embarkation will immediately take place at New York, but I have within these two hours obtained some particulars which may be depended on vizt. That the ten Regiments so long talked of as under Orders to Embark were really ordered by Ministry four or five months ago, but the Expedition (as its Called) remonstrated against, however a frigate arrived last Satirday with positive Orders for its takeing place, and the embarkation is to be Completed on Friday. Some talk of its being against S. Carolina, but believed more generally to be for the West Indies. A Brigade of Hessians and two Regiments of new Levies are actually embarked for Hallifax, with the remainder of troops they [are] to keep possession of New York & Rhode Island and to do all the mischief they can by detachments along shore & by sudden incursions† their next they say is to be at Eliza. Town & Newark. The 10th, 44th & 52nd are intirely Drafted the Officers gone home, the 10 Regiments to be Completed to 56 Rank & file a Company. I have sent Col; Dayton to Elizabeth Town with two Regiments, the other two will follow to morrow morning. Genl. Woodfords Brigade will go to New Ark, Col. Spencers Regiment with 12 light horse to Hackensack where he will be able to Collect Intelligence. Moylans horse to Westfeild where there is plenty of forage Collected. If your Excellency approves this disposition, it will be proper to order the Baggage of Genl. Woodfords Brigade to Come forward, as they have nothing with them; their artillery would be usefull, but I know not how to get it down unless some troops are Comeing this way. I hear Col. Baylor is in a fair way of recovering. I am
Your Excys.
most Obt. Servt.
Stirling


† Their own expression among the facetious ones is
“we are to turn it into a Buccaneering War”



His Excy. Genl. Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 26 September 1778 —
6 November 1778.

Taapan 15th October 1778

Sir,
The Glass your Excelly. desired to be procured for you, was in the Pocket of Major Clough when he fell into the hands of the Enemy, who left, neither him nor any other Officer, any of their Cloths but their Shirts – one of them (Capt. Swan,) not so much. Lord Stirling has a Glass of the same construction, made by the same hand; If your Excellency pleases, I will endeavour to procure it for you. Coll. Baylor, who I have the pleasure to acquaint you is in a fair way of being soon well, tells me, that Lord Stirlings Glass is preferable, much, to that, lately, Major Clough’s. I have the Honor to be
Your Excellencys Most Obedient
& most humble Servant
David Griffith



His Excelly. Genl. Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 26 September 1778 — 6 November 1778.

Aquackanoc Octor. 15: 1778

Dr. Sir
I wrote your Excellency yesterday from Hackensack, the parties of horse which followed the Enemy returned last night. They got to powles hook about one oClock, about one hundred Sail of transports lay off that place. This forrageing Jaunt has Cost the Enemy at least Seventy deserters a great proportion of them fine fellows Granadiers & light Infantry, we lost one a foreigner.
The troops are marching to their Stations, I expect to be at Elizabeth Town this Afternoon. I am
your Excellency’s
Most Obt. Humble Servant
Stirling



His Excellency Genl. Washington

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 26 September 1778 —
6 November 1778.

Taapan October 19th 1778

Dear Sir
You have been informed of my unfortunate Surprize of the 28th ultimo. I make no Doubt of the Circumstances, but I think it my Duty to make them known to you, 7 at the same Time to justify my Conduct.
On the 26 of Septr. I was at Paramus, with the Regt., where we had been four Days. I directed Major Clough the 26th to send the Quarter Master out to provide Quarters for the Regiment within four or five Miles of Paramus, & the same Distance from the Enemy that we there were, & at the same Time gave him my Reasons for so doing; “which he approved of” they were: that I was apprehensive that the Enemy would, if we remained more than three or four Days in one Place, attempt what they executed in two Days afterwards. On the morning of the 27th I marched the Regt. to the Quarters provided for us at Herringtown, & made it my Business, the Moment I arrived there, to make every necessary Enquiry about the Roads leading from the Enemy’s Encampment to our Quarters, & also went out & examined the Country myself. I was of Opinion it was the most secure Place I could have stationed myself in, & that it was convenient to gain the earliest Intelligence of the movement of the Enemy as it would have been had not they received the most particular Intelligence of our Guard & Patrole.
There were two Roads leading from the Enemies Camp to our Quarters, one on each side of the Hackensack River, they joined at a Bridge, at half a mile’s Distance from our Quarters, where I myself fixed a Guard, of a Serjeant & twelve men, with particular Orders to keep a Patrole of two men out on each of these Roads constantly, each to patrole a Mile below the Guard, & to be relieved every hour, the Guard were ordered to keep the strictest Look out at the Bridge, & I have Reason to believe that these Orders were punctually obeyed.
On the 28th early in the Morning the Enemy marched up on the west Side the Hackensack River within half a Mile of the Distance the Patroles went down the Road; they then sent off a Detachment through the Fields some Distance from the Road untill they had got above the Guard which they cut off without our hearing of it. All Communication being cut off from our Parties they marched up to our Quarters, & executed the horrid Massacre of which Doctor Griffith will inform you the particulars as appears from the Depositions.
I am happy to inform you that my wounds are nearly well & that I hope soon to regain my former State of Health.
I am with Respect
your most obt. and
very Humble Servant
George Baylor


[George Washington]


Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence, 26 September 1778 — 6 November 1778.